YOUR STORIES

 

The stories below are from Australia’s community of carers and other Australians who acknowledge and appreciate their remarkable efforts.

 

Your stories by year

No stories for 2020. Please check back soon.
  • Michelle

    VIC
    I’m caring for my mum as she has terminal cancer, she has cancer in both lungs, adrenal gland, lymph nodes in her neck and brain cancer, we’ve recently found out it’s gone from one tumour to now 5 in her brain, it’s very hard as I don’t live with her and I take care of my family and also my mum, I take her to all appointments, I also do her shopping and pay her bills as she doesn’t leave the house, only if needed, it takes it’s toll on me but I do it because I’m the only one that cares as she is my mum 😊
  • Cathy-jo Tame

    SA
    My daughter has a rare neurological condition causing her to not walk ,talk toilet feed and do every day activities most take for granted I also had a son with the same rare condition who passed away at 15mths my daughters life expectancy was 2 she is now 8 the neurologist has said due to the love and support she gets it shows in her health just how well looked after Meisha is now I ask you this, could the government afford to pay me for a 24/7 job and show this much love dedication and exhausting sleepless hours to keep my daughter alive and smiling ? I don’t think so but it would be nice
  • Jo Hamblyn

    SA
    My housemate and best friend ave been caring for each other and supporting each other through life for a few years now. We have both had traumatic events occur in our lives and have been left with PTSD, depression and other mental health issues. We stick together and have each others back because we get it. Sure there are times that it’s truely difficult and I would like things to be different, but at the end of the day, our lives are better because of the support we offer each other.
  • Steven Prime

    SA
    I am caring for my daughter, She suffered severe brain injury through medical neglect, Although they tried to get us to sign her over to state care, I dedicated my life to her the day she was born and that doesn't stop because of a brain injury. My responsibility is to make sure she has the best care I can give her and not palm her off. It is a massive sacrifice in my life but her smiles make it worth while. To be honest i hate how things are, always broke and restricted, but I know her life is as good as it can be and she is happy. My biggest fear is one day I won't be here.
  • Leesa Healy

    QLD
    I have worked in Mental Health and Disability for over 30 years. In that time have been blown away by the support, love, persistence, dedication and advocacy Carers provide for their loved ones. I have sat with carers through trauma and success's, through moments of incredible joy and moments of devastating pain. I have watched Mums fight the system for their child, I've watched siblings dealing with extraordinary behaviours with love and perseverance, I have listened to Dads express their helplessness and have celebrated with families when their loved ones have wins. Indeed I care.
  • Adele Ganley

    VIC
    I have 4 children. My 3 boys have varying levels of Autism, adhd. One has Oppositional behaviour disorder and another one has an intellectual disability. I am a Carer because it is my responsibility to take care of my children and teach them how to function in this world. One of my boys has moved out with his sister. One has started a job in July. Another one attends day services . They are all out there in the community participating as much as they can. I love to watch them grow and explore , success or failure. They come and talk to me about what happened that day . Hard but rewarding .
  • Belle Shields

    VIC
    I am a carer for my partner who is a wounded returned serviceman, my twin boys who have special needs, step mum of 3 boys who also have special needs as well and we became kinship carers for my nearly 2yo grandson who was born with an addiction I gave up my fulltime job as a trainer which I loved as my family was not able to function properly as my partner is battling severe complications from a replaced hip and is unable to walk and take care of himself or others So to keep my family together I do this as it needs to be done and I love them with all my heart and couldnt have it any other way.
  • Emma

    WA
    I have been caring for my beautiful mum around the clock 24/7 for the past 3 years while she courageously battles terminal pancreatic cancer. I do it because I love her. She’s had always been a gregarious fun loving crazy mum and nan and an absolute role model to me before her diagnosis. To see her now, the shell of what she was breaks my heart into pieces every day. Unless people have experienced the situation of caring for a loved one with an illness or medical condition, you do not realise the toll it takes on someone both physically and mentally. Carers of loved are angels on earth.
  • Louise

    NSW
    I am grateful every second of every day for our wonderful Mum. I am her carer. I love that we live together so I can get to tuck her in. I can care for her as well as have a full time Senior job role because I work in an organisation that champions flexible and agile working (Transport for NSW). Most importantly I have the support of my team and Manager, my "work family". It's a privilege and a pleasure to be able to look after my Mum. She's pretty awesome!
  • Ann Livingstone

    QLD
    Why do I care: it is my marriage promise: I married for better or worse, richer or poorer... it's what I do for my loved ones I am reliable, dependent, inexhaustible, boundless, steadfast, never failing... it is out of love, unselfish actions, my unfailing love for my family I can do what others what they are not able to my loved ones are valuable to me to do my best my family's needs and wishes are before mine it is worthy, practical, worthwhile... and it is rewarding... and I love every minute of it and I wouldn't change it...
  • Tracey Manz

    NSW
    My son is 22 autistic and nonverbal and I love and want the best that life can offer him ❤️
  • Karen

    QLD
    I am a full time carer to my artistic and intellectually impaired 22 year old son. I can imagine him living any where else, other then me. It is a full time job, but I love my son, and I feel, no body can do the job I can do. The love I have for my son, gives me the strength to continue to care for him. He has on going medical problems, which requires me to take him to different specialist, but I still wouldn't have it any other way. If you truly have a love and compassion for anybody with a disability, I believe you will always have a inner strength to continue to care for people.
  • Helen Thompson

    SA
    I care for my husband who is 92 years old. He is frail and had many health issues. I care for him simply because he needs help and I love him. I am just glad that I am able to do this for him. We get a lot of monetary assistance from the government which helps a lot and I must say I have nothing to complain about.
  • Clare

    VIC
    My dad had a stroke four years ago. He developed severe epilepsy and wernickes asphasia as a result and my mum is now his full time carer. My mum is the most patient, caring and eternally optimistic person. Her love for my dad is endless , but that does not mean sometimes it all gets too much . Dad is so lucky to have mum, and myself and five siblings are also, as she has made the loss of who my dad was, a new journey in life to be grateful for ❤️
  • Leanne Rich

    VIC
    I care for my son who is deaf and now has rheumatoid arthritis. I also care for my husband who had a motor cycle accident last year and has had multiple operations and stays in hospital and rehab. My parents are ageing and needing more support so we are moving interstate to be closer to them. Why? Because we are family, and families still together through thick and thin. How do I manage? One day at a time, and find fun everyday!
  • David Elmer

    TAS
    I believe they are worth every cent they get which bye the way is not much that is why I rely heavily on my wife as I am a person with MS
  • Vanessa Phillips

    SA
    I care for my 2 Autistic Children aged 11 & 14. My son (11) is gifted and also has ADHD so he's EXTREMELY BOUNCY. My daughter (14) has level 3 Autism, Low Memory Index and Anxiety, which means she can forget things and really struggle to understand instructions so she requires constant care. I have fibromyalgia, chronic pain, BPD, anxiety and other health issues. So I help my son mentally work through stuff and he helps me physically. My husband works, but is amazing too. I do it because these guys are my everything and I love them unconditionally. I will advocate for them forever!
  • Victoria Cole

    VIC
    Hi my name is Victoria and i care for both my parents. Im 24 years of age with both parents under 60. Its hard at time dont get me wrong we are all thickheaded but we all love each other, i still work but i moved back with my parents to help look after them, my father has Parkistians and diabetes and mother has alot of metal illiness that stop her from everyday life. Being an only child can be hard sometimes and i sometimes feel alone. So it is hard but also so rewarding i think im one of the only 24year olds who are so close to their parents and i love them so much!
  • Beverley

    QLD
    Because she my beautiful daughter I care because I love her more then life. Who else would care for my beautiful daughter like I do I care out of love for my child and I have cared for her for 50 years in December and will go on caring until the last breath in my body And then I am coming back as a dog so after death I’ll care for her in a dogs body not mine Why do I care for the love of Naomi that’s why I care For the love of my daughter for 50 years
  • F Burgmann

    QLD
    My Nan is a pretty special person. She cared for me when I was a baby and now I get the opportunity to care for her as an elderly person. I get to complete the cycle. I love my Nan.
  • Del Smith

    WA
    Because they are our babies and we love them unconditionally! They bring all sorts of joy to our lives, they make us very proud every single day. Our two sons are diagnosed with Autism and they have significant support needs. Our big goal we are working towards is for them to live long, healthy and active lives, and have a lovely home of their own in which they are well supported, and that we can again just be Mum and Dad.
  • Sarah Cunningham

    NSW
    I am a mum first and foremost to my 2 beautiful children who both have disabilities. My son is 7 and he has Down syndrome, Autism, hearing impaired and intellectual disability. My daughter is 11 and she has Autism, a rare form of Epilepsy, ADHD, intellectual disability. I am a carer and a teacher and an advocate for them both. To say it is difficult is an understatement but there are also many amazing moments of laughter and joy with them both. I care because it is my role, my responsibility to ensure both my kids get the same opportunities and have to best possible life we can give them.
  • Sarina Bonnes

    SA
    My son David is nearly 23 years old, extremely handsome, and is Autistic, non-verbal. I care for him because he’s a part of me, he is my life, and we are a team. I am his voice when he cannot express himself, I am his his intuition when he just doesn’t know, and I am his reasoning when he doesn’t understand. We will walk together in life hand in hand & heart to heart, because caring for my son comes naturally, and I do it because that is the life I have been given, and I couldn’t be more appreciative. I guess I am his angel who helps him to stand when his wings have forgotten how to fly ❤️
  • Siri Alluru

    WA
    I care for a friend with Parkinson's. He was always there for me when I needed someone. I care because I love him with all my heart.
  • Chris Goodwin

    NSW
    I Am an unpaid carer, well, I help with my mother who is 87yrs, I helped mum with dad who had Alzheimer’s dementia for 3 yrs , then 7mths after his devastating stroke till he passed. Then I had to lookout for my mother to recover and now, with the help of home care, I assist in her everyday mental health and overseeing of her health etc, general house/garden duties, financials, I live just around the cnr from her. It is hard on work( building contractor) which has become selective, no social life unless you call shopping day as social. I am 1 of 4 siblings, I trained as RTN 1980. Not easy.
  • Laura McVeigh

    WA
    I am my Mum's carer, and have been on and off for 24 years, since I was 13. It's been more and more necessary for the past 15 years, and full time for the past 5 years. She suffers from debilitating anxiety and depression, but mostly I care for her because she has a rare kidney disorder as a result of chemotherapy (she's beat cancer three times!) It's exhausting at times, but it's worth the effort to know that she's safe and comfortable instead of nervous or distressed. The whole experience has inspired me to study counselling so I can help others in a similar situation.
  • Katie

    ACT
    My husband had a stroke in Dec 17 and life as we knew it stopped. With no income and 3 kids, I stepped up and now I am mum to 3 kids and carer to my husband. I care because I love him and our kids have the best role model in their lives. There is no point in letting life stop. Find something each day to laugh about.
  • Nat

    WA
    NSW 3 months ago my life was turned upside down I have epilepsy I had a flu shot I ended up on life support or a week this nearly killed me my mum flew from WA at my bedside. 2 weeks later my mum was diagnosed with terminal cancer and my daughter also was going through a diagnosis of epilepsy too, My partner,myself and 6 year old daughter moved across the country to WA recently to care for my terminally ill mum and I was at her bedside the whole time caring for her as she did for me in prior weeks and to spend her remaining months with her. I care because Carers need to be recognised.
  • Lissa Shay

    NSW
    I care for my 90 year old mum because I love her. She cared & raised me, and has always been there for me, so why wouldn’t I care for her in her old age. Initially, I moved in with mum, but as her condition has declined and I have required more family assistance to care for her, she has moved in with us. The family love having Granny around and spending quality time with her. It’s the way it should be!
  • Mummy Iles

    QLD
    I care because my 9 year old autistic son needs all the help and support I can provide for him to help the wide world fit him. I also care because my hubby needs my help and support to cope with his daily anxiety and depression hurdles. I care because I am the voice of reason and encouragement for my two very best friends who as Mum’s also struggle with depression and anxiety with the tasks of daily living. I would not have these four very special and different peeps any other way ;) and I love them deeply xx
  • Valerie Stopford

    QLD
    My sister and I moved in with our parents 15 months ago to care for them both as they were both elderly and in bad health. They had never wanted to go into a nursing home and we always told them, we would not allow it happen. We chose to do this because throughout our lives, our parents were always there for us. It has never been a chore - although we are no longer as young as we once were and it is physically hard at times - we would not change a thing. Dad passed away 4 months ago and Mum is now ‘full assist’ as her heart failure and dementia have worsened since his passing.
  • Liz

    VIC
    I Care because I Love my Husband for richer or poorer in sickness & health that’s the oath I took ... My husband had a Stroke in 2011 it’s been a hard road he’s lost a lot but also, I’v lost a lot “my husband” the one I married the rock I thought I could lean on I’ve lost my job my friends and the opportunity to live MY life my way. I once wrote a post on FB to ask Hotels to give Carers a weekend free not one responded ..... I get tired of fighting the system and explaining everything as my husband has Aphasia please understand “Carers are people too” just the same as you !
  • Craig Tindall

    NSW
    I care for my elderly 83yr old mum...she doesn't drive anymore and has problems with her balance..so I'm here to assist her in her everyday. Society tends to write off our elderly ...however they still have alot to give back.
  • Linda Mottram

    NSW
    I care because my daughter has a mild intellectual disability and needs as much support and care as we can give her.
  • Kayla Tacken

    VIC
    For as long as I can remember my mother has been there for me. In every single way I can think of. I have suffered with mental illness; BPD, Anxiety, PTSD and depression for about 16 years now and she has been there every step of the way. Bullying, illness, welfare issues. I have had brain injury, memory loss, loss of licence. I lost the ability to walk, mum was there through every step of recovery & she's done it all on her own. I owe her everything. Without her I wouldn't be here any more....
  • David Terelinck

    QLD
    I care because I love the person I care for. They get better and more personalized care at home. The care I deliver is as good as formal care facilities. I have a background as a RN (no longer practicing) so the care I give is every bit as competent as elsewhere. I have more time to devote one-on-one than in other facilities. I understand the needs of my loved one, and what is important to them. I have trust issues with aged care institutions given I have worked in them and know financial and staffing deficiencies. And I can provide care cheaper than the system can.
  • CHRISTINE BANNEAR

    WA
    My son was diagnosed with Advanced Heart Failure in 2015 at the age of 31. He had to stop work as an Electrical Contractor with his own business and moved home with me. He has since gradually grown weaker and now at the age of 35 may not see his 36th birthday in December. So heartbreaking but he is my son and I love him more than anything in the world. He now is too weak for a Heart Transplant which at one stage was an option. I will be beside him through this journey not matter what.
  • Bryan Stevenson

    NSW
    Our daughter has CP Quadraplegia high tone non verbal but a more delightful smile you will not see anywhere. She is one of 3 and our 2 boys are wonderful with her. It’s funny. Everyone says how they admire Carers for what they do and admire how they get on with things etc etc. But rarely does anyone acknowledge you as a carer or encourage you or offer to assist. I get it- it’s tough. Everyone throws platitudes but not much is real. The community we live in pretends they are communal but only if you can join them in a piss up in the park. It’s a clique not a community. Great initiative this wee
  • Elizabeth

    NSW
    I care because really no one cares like a mother, we know exactly what she likes to eat, her likes and dislikes about everything. I have a 34 year old girl with Down Syndrome and I’m not saying it has been an easy road. Ear infections at 2 months, bowel problems on solid foods, leading to a late diagnosis of Coeliac disease and thyroid problems. She has been a real ‘on the go’ child and now has gone into a slow period. Things change as with all of us. I would not give her up for the world but I value my time when she is out doing things for herself.
  • Briony

    VIC
    I have two boys with Autism and Duchennes Muscular dystrophy.
  • Leanne Allen

    QLD
    I care because seeing them become all they can be is very important to me. Being a non paid carer has it's ups and downs and can put a strain on ya own health and isn't easy financially. People judge you and class you as unemployed but in reality our job is 24/7 But despite all that what I do is important for my family and the community. There needs to be more awareness so thank you Carers Australia.
  • Sarah Jane Richards

    SA
    I care because she is my daughter and a Mother's love is unconditional,I will love my children no matter the challenges,my daughter has a chromosome missing in her genes,similar traits to asbergers, life has been quiet a challenge at times but I wouldn't change anything,I love my daughter and I know she loves me.
  • Debbie Graham

    NSW
    I care because I brought my children into the world. I care because they are my life. I care for my son with cerebral palsy and I care for my 3 children with Autism. They deserve love and care and an amazing life. I am the luckiest mum to walk this earth. To be given such amazing humans to care for. I love them.
  • Nic

    ACT
    My son was diagnosed with Autism this year. Before that, we knew something wasn't right and it was a long, painful journey to get any answers - including a lot of uncalled for judgement on our parenting skills. We have a lifetime of advocacy ahead of us on his behalf, fighting to get the support he needs. We care because we believe in him and want him to have the opportunities his peers will get. Every week is a challenge emotionally and physically. We have no support mechanisms, are socially isolated, and paid employment is becoming almost impossible to maintain. A tough road paved with love.
  • Richard burton

    VIC
    I care because with me my parents brought me up the person I am today it's not much to care for them in there aging years and not put them in a home and I take of my wife's parents now it's a prevalege to do so
  • Patricia Cook

    QLD
    3 years ago I meet the love of my life. Everything was wonderful. Then in 2018 he had a workplace accident where he broke his arm. Whilst in hospital a incidental find of a Glioblastoma grade 4 was discovered. To say this was devestating is just beyond words. He had a partial removal of tumour and treatment, then this year a regrowth with more surgery and on going chemo. We had planned to grow old together. Now we plan next steps to take. It's is finacillally and emotionally crippling. I know one day this horrible disease will take him and I don't know if I will cope.
  • Manjit & Rajinder

    NSW
    We have a son Omkar he is been diagnosed with Dravet Syndrome. Epilepsy and Intellectual Disability .
  • kathy hilton

    VIC
    i have always cared for my 18 years old son, i new at 18mths old he was going to have problems,he has mental healthy issues, ADHD, ODD, depression/anxiety, he has been assessed for bi polar, and he is of high risk bi polar, he has been hard work, sometime, i just feel like ending it so i dont have to deal with the violence, temper, breaking of my property, putting holes in the walls etc i eve had to send my youngest to live with his father for 7 years so i could try and sort out what was wrong with him, hardest thing i ever had to do, THE MENTAL HEALTH SYSTEM IS BROKEN.
  • Sue Castles

    NSW
    I care for my Hubby Gary as he has now become a Palliative Care Patient and wants to die at home. Also my Asperger's son. I check in on a couple of Elders too. It's in my nature to be a carer as I'm also a trained Support Worker/AIN. There's so much we can do to help.
  • Peter Boek

    NSW
    My sister has now cared for her wheelchair-bound husband with MS for over 15 years. This places both mental and physical stress on her...without a break. I admire her dedication and sacrifice, often without much thanks, because it is simply expected of her.
  • Joan Apthorp

    QLD
    My husband has Alzheimer’s Dementia. He needs to be looked after, but is still able to live at home - as long as his practical needs are taken care of. I shop, cook, launder, take him to appointments, and all the rest. He is still a precious person.
  • Kaityn

    QLD
    I'm 13 and I care for my mum with my dad's help because she has a permanent disability that can't be cured called fibromyalgia which puts her in bed in pain almost 24/7. It takes it's toll on me and my dad to care for her and look after the house and usually puts everyone in a bad mood. It's extremely hard especially as my dad's having trouble getting a permanent job and I noticed lately that I may have depression as I isolate myself and aren't as happy as I was. It's so hard for me because I don't get to live my fullest teen life and I get into trouble for not helping.
  • Joan

    VIC
    My husband has Parkinson,s disease.If I don’t care for him he would have to be put in to an aged care facility and that would cost the government lots. Plus I love him and therefore care for his wellbeing. No one can look after him better than me. I understand him.
  • Emma Robertson

    NSW
    I care as I wasn’t given a choice when our son at the age of 7 was diagnosed with ADHD then by the age of 10 again diagnosed with serious sleep apnea, anxiety and depression, it was a long and hard road and a lot to process but I would not change it for the world or my son because for him I have a better understanding on why things happen and how?
  • Nerrel Loader

    NSW
    I care because my daughter did not ask to be born into this world with a disability. As her parent it is my responsibility to care for her and ensure she is happy for as long as I live. It is the least I can do and I am happy to do it.
  • Gordon Fisher

    QLD
    my wife broke 2 bones in her left leg and dislocated her ankle after a fall at home, she has had a 30cm pin put in her leg.she is not very mobile,i work 30 hrs a week,and care for my wife,household duties,bed making,washing,getting my wife showered,some of the cooking,gardening,shopping,taking my wife to drs appointments,it looks like it is am ongoing issue.
  • Michele

    NSW
    I care for my Mother. She is 85 years old has a pacemaker, lung condition and deafness awaiting for cochlear surgery. I care because she is my mother. She raised all us kids (5) and lost (2) and although we were poor we were loved unconditionally. Because I’m the youngest and have a Nursing background my family have sort of indirectly nominated me to look after her. It can be challenging at times because she has gotten cranky as she has aged but that beautiful smile gets me every time. She looked after us, nurtured us, loved us, taught us and was always kind and patient. Paying back ❤️
  • Joyce Renna

    VIC
    My husband and I took my parents into our home we knew that it would be hard knowing my father had dementia ,We lost my father five years ago but still look after my mum which she is 87 years old. In my heart we knew that it was the right thing to do. I’m 55 years old look after my grandkid, my mum and also work at home looking after other people children which get hard sometime but I’m so grateful I have a beautiful husband and beautiful child that can help me also. No regrets
  • Sharon Moore

    NSW
    My 94 year old dad wasn’t happy where he was so I took over. He’s never been so happy now with me. I love him dearly and only want the absolute best for him in his final years. It’s hard work, I get very tired, but, He’s worth it. I love my dad.
  • Leeanne Evans

    NSW
    I made a commitment to my husband when we first meant that I would always be his friend that commitment turned in to love so when he was diagnosed with early onset Alzheimer’s/Dementia two years ago there was no question as to who was going to be his career. He is the love of my life and from now on I will do everything in my power to make his life as easy as possible.
  • Helen Parer

    QLD
    Caring for my son with high support needs can be hard at times and people often say to my husband and l your so good, your so special but we don't see it like that, to us it's just a normal part of our life, unconditional love to our son. l start the day with a smile from my son and that says more than any words, it's those simple moments in a carers life that get you through the toughest day.
  • Lisa Evans

    QLD
    I'm a mother/carer of 8 kids, 3 of them with different disability's and a husband with back problems from a work injury, I know how hard it can be, at times worse then others, I have so much respect for carers cause I know some others have it worse then me,, carers stay strong in those hard times
  • MARY SYDEKUM

    VIC
    My husband and I shared almost forty years of happy married life together, before he had a stroke. (We learned that he had previously had two minor strokes)which we were not aware of. We married in 1980, and the vows we made to one another were; "To Love and Honour and Respect one another in sickness and in health" which we both took seriously, With therapy and a lot of hard work he recovered around 80% of his mental and physical ability. He then was diagnosed with bowel cancer and has had an operation , and is slowly recovering. I am honoured to care for him.
  • Lorraine

    VIC
    Out of 4 children I would never have guessed I would have be the one to be a carer for firstly my mum until she passed away and now my father who has lived with us for the past 7 yrs. It's something you never think about but it's been an honour.
  • Yvonne Summers

    VIC
    My son and I both have a mental illness so we are each other's carer. Caring for another person helps us both to reach our goals.
  • Sonya Garton

    VIC
    Because if I didn't noone would.i have care of my 14 year old grandson. It's hard at times but worth it
  • Wendy Richardson

    QLD
    I love my husband and I love our family and I want to see him live his best life possible. Diagnosed with aggressive t-cell lymphoma at the young age of 48, which originally responded well to treatment but returned even more aggressively requiring a stem cell transplant at 49. Poor dear man now has chronic GVHD and has a severely restricted life at 52. But he’s still with us ... such a blessing 💝
  • Vanessa

    NSW
    I love caring for my nanny by another, everyday as it gives her a helping hand around the home which she still lives alone at 96 yrs old. She gives me so much happiness knowing how much being with her makes her so truly happy. I love just being with her even just as company most days as there aint no family here 4 her. I feel loved n appreciated more than i can say as shes so grateful 4 all that i do 4 her
  • Traci

    NT
    I’m not a carer but I support unpaid carers because of the added sacrifice they make. To be a carer is time consuming. They don’t just take time out of their own lives to care for someone else, they sacrifice time otherwise spent in paid work. This impacts on their own quality of life because of the reduced income they receive. The caring they do is so so important because without them, the only option for the people in their care would be nursing homes. A nursing home cannot match the quality of life they’d get living in their own homes, particularly for non elderly patients. And...#family
  • Karen Griffiths

    WA
    My husband has been caring for due to mental health issues. One year ago he got stage 4 advanced prostate cancer. The treatment worked and he is a survivor. Once he recovered I collapsed and went to psych hospital for a month. If it wasn't for the support of our friends and my husband's family, we would have been in an extremely difficult situation. However, we both are survivors, thanks to caring compassionate people.
  • Helen

    SA
    My husband has health issues which requires lots of support. I am happy to see to his needs but I do get tired as I am old too. We hope to continue living in our home which has a beautiful view of Encounter Bay.
  • Rachel Hammond

    SA
    I care because I can support my daughter and go through the challenges, ups, downs and everyday difficulties her condition gives her together. Why should anyone need to fight alone. Being in the health industry I see many struggle everyday, creating a smile for just one person a day means a life changed and my job done.
  • Pauline

    NSW
    I help care for my mother, I think that she cared for me when I was growing up now it's my turn to care for her
  • Cassandra Watson

    QLD
    I care out of love. To be there for someone who was there for me from the beginning is the best feeling.
  • Glen Taylor

    QLD
    I care for my neithew who has autism ,his parents can't look after him so I do,since the day I took over from his parents ,i have got a lot of injoyment looking after him I love him so much , he's like my best friend rather than my neithew ,we have so much fun when where together,
  • Mary Dunlop

    WA
    It's who l am and what l do everyday of my life for my husband, family and furkids. I think of little else and it makes me very content and happy. Giving back is what it's all about. I would do this, paid or not. I'm just thankful l am still able to as l am recently diagnosed terminal with IPF.
  • Annetta Oakes

    WA
    1 care because I like seeing a smile there face when I arrive. I love to give them a hug. I care because one day it might be us. I care as the person your looking at might have been your parent, partner , child. We care because we can. It brought tears to my eyes every time I went to take my mother out for the day and see the disappointment on the others residents that had no one who cared.
  • Marion

    QLD
    I was not given a choice. I made a commitment to my husband and I will do what I can as long as I can to care for him. It’s hard. It’s depressing. It’s gut wrenching. It’s frustrating. But at the end of the day it’s how I show him live and respect. My concern is I may not last the distance.
  • Sharna bull

    SA
    I care for 3 boys because no ones cares and understands them better than me
  • CINDY Clamp

    QLD
    I love to care i l9ve to help
  • Gayle Boardman

    QLD
    I'm a carer for my mum. We live Oaky Creek Q 4285. Mum is unable to get caring assistance due to where she lives, apparently we are too far for anyone to care... I get paid from Centerlink a carers payment/allowance which is deducted from because my husband works. I CARE because I LOVE ♥️ my Mum & she needs Me. 😊
  • Suzanne Jones

    QLD
    I care because it is easy to care for the ones I love. I am a Carer for my husband who’s a paraplegic my elderly mother ( but I also respect their independence) I also am raising my three grandchildren. My love for these people is enormous and yes it can get hard but the love and respect I get back and the fact I am making their lives easier and more fulfilling is enough for me
  • Donna Reardon

    QLD
    Every body is entitled to experience the best life can offer them. So through caring for others I receive personal joy in seeing them achieve and experience this.
  • Leonie

    VIC
    I did the respite care for my autistic nephew for many years. Thoroughly loved it but his parents needed to be supported through their journey as a family.
  • Carole Power

    QLD
    My husband was diagnosed with Alzheimer's 5 years ago. I care for him because he has been a wonderful husband, I love him and want to make the last year's of his life as happy for him (and me) as possible. I find the hardest part of caring is trying to stay patient and not speak harshly or act frustrated. I try to remember how he feels but at times it is takes everything I can draw on to remain calm. We still have a loving relationship and can enjoy an evening out once a week (not easy though). I try not to dwell on the future as I know it will be even tougher than it is now.
  • Carmen camilleri

    NSW
    I care because I love. I care because none can do it better then me. I care because of my commitment and I care because nobody else does.
  • Fay Bielewicz

    My husband’s memory loss, lack of balance and incontinence was caused by a pituitary tumour. While I can cope I will look after him, he is not able to be left unattended as he wanders, and can’t even remember where the bathroom or bedroom is. I do get some help during the week.
  • Tracey

    NT
    I care because I love them. I've been a carer since my first child was born and I discovered an entire chapter was missing from the instruction manual. The one that tells you how to deal with raising kids that don't follow the plan, navigating health systems intent on pushing you under a carpet, accessing education suited to those who don't fit the mould and how to advocate for every single thing you need. All while being unemployable, shunned and sleep deprived. Yet after all that I walked into a new relationship and now care for my partner with schizophrenia - because I love him.
  • Jennifer Wild

    NSW
    I cared for my mother who passed away in September at 95. She asked to live with me just before her 90th birthday. I cared for her at home for over 5.3 years, except for her times in respite care and hospital. I did not want her to be in an aged care facility as I was not impressed by what was available. The last 9 months were hard as she had a number of falls, resulting in a broken wrist and skin tears. Too much time was spent in hospital, where many do not understand the needs of the elderly, especially those with moderate dementia. Chemical restraint is not an acceptable solution!!
  • Roslyn Davey

    QLD
    I am actually a carer and there are some folks out there that need that little bit of extra help in their life, to make things easier for them
  • Lee-Anne

    QLD
    When my daughter was born, a blue baby, and they resuscitated her several times. Doctors told us that it didn’t ‘look good’. I prayed that God would give this precious baby life and knew then that I’d do anything to keep her alive. 28 years later, I thank God every day for another day with her in our lives. Brain damaged and Intellectually impaired, not expected to walk, talk or have any ‘normal’ sort of life....I care for her, because God gave her to us and I’ll love her till God takes one of us from the other. Then at 18, her Dad was diagnosed with Early Onset Dementia and the story goes on
  • Hermann Weber

    SA
    My wife of 60 years developed Dementia over the last two years. I am now her full time carer. There is no way I would allow her to be put into an Institution. As we are advanced in years I hope we will go the distance in our home.
  • Colleen Styles

    WA
    My son suffered a brain injury 8 years ago, and although he made a fairly good recovery, he needs help with everyday living skills to get by.
  • Leanne

    SA
    My daughtwe was diagnosed at age 12 with Aspergers and needs help with most things. I mainly care for her on my own with help from another daughter. Its amazing what we do as a parent/son/daughter to care for our loved ones even with our own health problems.
  • Samantha McBride

    I'm not a carer myself but I will always be grateful to my Dad's wife Joyce for taking such wonderful care of him when he needed it.
  • Wayne Swan

    NSW
    I originally was a carer for my Nanna. Giving insulin injections & other medications taking her to appointments & keeping life as normal for her as s posibble... Now im a carer for both my parents Dad is legally blind & mum has osteo arthritis + other problems for both...why have i done this..simple my nanna helped raise me & my sister while parents both worked low income jobs to keep & give us what was needed. I'm returning what they did & gave us to the best of my ability...with the love & attention & consideration they gave us..
  • jan blair

    VIC
    I have had my grandson since he was 9 days old due to my beautiful daughter not coping, he is now 10 and has been diagnosed with ADHD, SPD and ASD. He also suffers from severe Asthma.....it hasnt been easy but we live day by day and get through. He is the most loving little boy who adores his nanny (me ). I sometimes think what would have happened to him if I didnt take him ...it makes me feel sick thinking about it. I dont get much of a break/Respite. I will always be here for him no matter what, ever through my own ill health. Being his carer is the best job anyone could ever have.
  • Tony

    NSW
    I care for my wife who is 70 because I love her so much, she suffers constantly with ME/CFS , but I think I'm the lucky one, not just because I'm reasonably healthy but because of the the Joy I get out of caring for her.
  • Lynette Hansen

    NT
    When there is nothing left, you’re exhausted, sad, desperately lonely, you can and do, still care.
  • Shan peckham

    QLD
    I care for my mother 86 with dementia. My daughter 32 with seizures. My son 30 with inflammatory arthritis. I have work in disability and aged care. I don't trust the system to give them the care they need. The workers are over stretched and are driven by companies worried about their profit not the care that is needed. I believe this is due to the government slowly breaking down family values. The system is broken with no clear positive outcome for those in need of assistance. I care because it's the ultimate way of showing your family they are still loved.
  • Geoff Sandercock

    SA
    My wife has become very dependant on me to help lpp her with all things if I wasn't able to help her she would need to be in a home i love her very much and am only too happy to assist her to make her life more bearable
  • Susanna Cecchini

    VIC
    I have worked and as carer for several years and love it. People said I am good because I give a lot but they don't know how much all the carers are getting back. Still doing volonteering works
  • Lynda Meers

    NSW
    I care because I love my brother and while he doesn't need a lot of help, I want to support him as much as I can.
  • Kerryn Cunningham

    SA
    I am my disabled daughter’s voice, and through me I’m showing our community that it’s ok to different and to be accepted that this is the way she is, because it’s my dream that one day she will become independent in her own right ( with another carer). She can be challenging but this is why I love to show and teach her life skills. We love her very much and couldn’t imagine our lives without her
  • Lesley Wilson

    NSW
    Because she is my mother and cannot get around as she used too
  • Bron Rumble

    VIC
    He’s my son. My job as a parent is to give him the best foundation, help build resilience, help him see possibilities, celebrate the good and bad, support him and just be there. The rest is up to him. I can’t walk in his shoes but I can walk in front, beside and behind. And then I volunteer as a Joey Scout Leader where I repeat the above. My motivation: Help other people and Pay it forward.
  • Katerina

    ACT
    I care because my love for my boys is unconditional and for the last 11 years they have needed me more than I could manage while working. I care because of who they are now, not for what I expect them to become in the future. I have learnt to bend like bamboo when life gets tough, and by God it can get tough. It has stretched me, broken me in places I never thought possible. The boys are thriving, their Autism (aspergers) is ever colourful. They see the world differently. Their uniqueness has added a depth this world needs. I care because they are worth it.
  • Leanne

    NSW
    I care for my mum purely because I love her. I started my caring role when she became very sick and my dad had dementia. We both cared for him till he died 3 years ago. Now mum is chronicly unwell and she couldn’t manage living alone both financially or physically. I care for her because when she goes to hospital the medical staff just see a frail 80 year old lady and I have to advocate for her, they don’t see how she is when she is well. I care because she is the only mum I will ever have.
  • DEBBIE ANNE DOUTHAT

    VIC
    My hubby type 1 diabetic, why do i do it. Love
  • Hailey Hansford

    SA
    I am a carer because family is the most important thing and when my brother, mother and father needed help it felt natural to step into that roll. I know if the situation was reversed they would do the same for me as there is nothing I would not do for my family.
  • john

    SA
    I gave up work to become a fulltime carer to my son when he was 11 months old . that was 19 yrs ago. I have since become carer to my partner of 20 plus years and am now a grandparent carer raising my granddaughter. The reason i became a carer is because this is my family and if i dont do it no one will. I have learnt so much in the years i have been a carer so much that you never learn about in a normal life or school
  • Paul Bowd

    NSW
    My wife looked after me our entire marriage until she got osteoporosis and has a bad time with it. I care for her because i love her .
  • Belinda

    NSW
    I care for my partner & my daughter because I love them & having a chronic illness myself with no help/support from friends/family & hardly any providers I know the true struggles. We have our good & bad days but we get through & keep each other strong. Support, empathy, understanding & less judgement from some services/providers would make a huge difference ....as well as more affordable medical services etc. Thank you & massive hugs to all the carers out there 🤗😃
  • Leanne Bengtsson

    WA
    I have two disabled children that are now adults. They still need a lot of care. Both physically and mentally. They both have autism. Also a severe joint disorder. Also asthma , and multiple allergies
  • Melissa

    QLD
    Hi, I care for my mum and have ever since I was 14 and a half. My mum suffered a stroke and I quit school to look after her. I looked after her and did home school. She had 2 heart attacks and I still look after her to this day. It’s very rewarding and I love it.
  • Kerrie Jones

    VIC
    I care for my husband who has Young onset Lewy body dementia, PTSD and major depression, as well as my 28 yr old daughter who has significant mental health issues. Why? Because I love them both and if I did not care it would mean that my hubby would be placed into an Aged Care facility...at the age of 62!! He is not old and I will for as long as I can provide him with the love and care he deserves to keep him at home where he is familiar and loved. For my daughter, my caring role means she stays alive, develops and grows her confidence, is surrounded and supported by love and understanding
  • David

    VIC
    There's a bumper sticker which states "take Revenge live long enough to be a burden to your children" In my case my mother has achieved this but it's a burden that I accept with honour. The cards that life has dealt me has afforded me the position of being able to take care of her and keep her home for as long as possible. We are truly blessed by the circumstances
  • Belinda jones

    SA
    I care for my son how 17 year old how love very much
  • Rose Brayne

    VIC
    My husband has PSP and I care because I love him and within the difficult days (There are so many) there is a smile sometimes, and that makes it all worthwhile.
  • Sharon Fry

    NSW
    I care for my husband as he has back injuries and can no longer work and it is something I feel I should do as his wife in good times and bad times I also have a daughter with dyslexia 2 sons one with moderate intellectual disability and my youngest son has epilepsy
  • Jan

    NSW
    I care for my 86 year old husband who I love dearly. He has age related issues including kidney failure. I wouldn't have it any other way.
  • Amanda Cesareo

    SA
    I am carer of my two adult son I care for them because I love them also want the best for them and am the only advocate for them as dad has another family life. The people we care for we do what can so they can quality of life.
  • Kelly Sue Solly

    VIC
    I care for my son for 17 yrs and he is the happiest boy with what the doctors told me that he would not make it passed 2yrs of age I think I'm blessed to still have him. My son has so many things wrong with him he can't walk or talk but his big smile is the best to know he is happy.
  • Melissa bates

    QLD
    Love my son who has special needs my other son who has epilepsy and look after my 89 year old father as well. I love them all and it’s out of love that I look after them. They are my life my love and I couldn’t be without them.
  • Natalie Innes

    WA
    I brought my Nan to live with me so she doesn't have to move into a home. At 95 her legs have given up on her due to crippling arthritis. Sh has significant hearing loss from her service in WWII (radar control) and she is blind in her right eye. What she does have is her mind, and having such a keen awareness makes life almost unbearable when you are stuck in a chair all day long. I want the final years of my Nan's life to be comfortable and surrounded with family and memories so I have put my life on hold to take care of her as she needs someone with her around the clock.
  • Michelle Viney

    VIC
    I care for my 12 year old daughter who has ADHA, Epilepsy, Learning Difficulties. I love her to the World and back, but no one understands her as l do. I would do anything for her.👍🦄
  • Cheryl Wilson

    VIC
    I care for my 74 year old ex husband who suffers from dementia and peripheral valve disease. He has no one else who could care for him and the only option would be an aged care home.
  • Glen Mitchell

    QLD
    I care for my aged mother, she cared for me all the time that I was growing up so now it's my turn to care for her
  • Therese Murphy

    VIC
    My hubby had dementia and I am his sole carer and do it because I love him. Even when it gets tough I do it as none of his family care enough to give any sort of support.
  • Simone

    SA
    I care for my daughter as who is going to be a better advocate and voice for her more, than her Mum. I adore how unique my daughter is and I support her with any challenges that will arise in her life.
  • Ellisa

    QLD
    I care because she deserves the best. The best care, best therapy, best experiences, so she can excel and be the best form of herself now and in the future.
  • David Jobling

    SA
    I care because I can, I want to contribute the best I can because I know how important it is to be engaged and involved positively with people around you. The reality of life imposes stresses of dealing with a variety of things for every individual, in the case of my charge, helping a first generation child of refugee parents learn and speak English in a safe and supporting role is rewarding in every step we take towards a positive future.
  • Michelle Dever

    NSW
    I care because she is my daughter and even though she is mentally disabled due to being born with microcephaly, i will always love and care. I get attacked, sworn at and life is difficult, i know she loves me too.
  • Deirdre Barry

    NSW
    My name is Deirdre Barry I started a Carers support group every 2nd Tuesday here in our village. A lot of residents needed a little respite with looking after their loved ones, who have dementia, parkinsons disease, stroke and many other aged illnesses. I find this volunteer work just so rewarding. To see the smiles on their faces if they win Bingo or if we have a singalong or when our therapy dog Chase, turns up, is all worth it! The carers appreciate our help so much as well. We are here for each other and will continue to be so!
  • Margaret Watson

    QLD
    My mum was diagnosed with terminal multiple myeloma in Jan this year, she's 79.my mum has raised six children and I am the oldest. My mum has always been there for me . my mum was born during ww2 her father went Mia. So her mother put all four children in a orphanage and walked away, the first part of my mums life was horrid and half starved the second part of her life she put us kids first always making sure we had food on the table always putting us first so I promised her I will look after her for the rest of her life,im shattered that I'm going to loose her.
  • Amy chadha

    NSW
    I work as a paid carer for aged and disabled and unpaid carer at home because I love to help and give comfort to people in need of care . I feel blessed and contented when I bring a smile on their face because of my care and concern .
  • Clare Goodall

    WA
    I care about carers because carers have some of the lowest wellbeing levels of any group in Australia, do an amazing job of looking after their loved ones and deserve more support and recognition! I care about carers because making the decision to look after a loved one shouldn't mean you have to sacrifice your own wellbeing to such a large degree. Many of us will need care at some point in our lives and any of us could need to become a carer, for a wide range of reasons. If every one of us realised this, we as a nation would passionately advocate for better support for carers.
  • Bernadette Chance

    NSW
    If I don't care who will???? My daughter has been living with a serious mental health illness for the past 30 years. Treatments to date do not have the desired effect despite my girl complying always with her medication regime. We don't have family in Australia so there's no family help. I am divorced and her father doesn't provide support. She is a beautiful, caring, sensitive and intelligent human being who deserves the love and support that I provide. She's often said, 'I'd be dead if it wasn't for your love and support Mum'. It's been a hard road but it's made me a much better person
  • Ann Massey

    NSW
    I have an adult daughter with Prader Willi Syndrome, she is my first born, my precious little girl who will always remain a girl never turning into a woman even though she is 37 years old. Prader Willi Syndrome means that as a carer you are forever worrying, hovering, protecting and keeping safe the person with this syndrome who will do anything literally lie, cheat, thieve, eat from bins, eat left unattended food to satisfy their insatiable appetite. Her life span depends entirely on my ability to keep her safe from food, a battle of juggling quality of life and quantity of life.
  • Phil Lang

    NT
    I am a single dad, with 2 on the spectrum, both high functioning and trying their hardest to survive main stream school. I care firstly because I am a parent and they are my world and in being that I am their 'safe place', their friend, and in some ways their mentor. You are their shoulder to cry on, their support when things are being too hard and their guide in life's journey. It is hard and can be very isolating, both personally and socialy, also impacting on work amongst other things. We do this basically because we love them no matter how hard it can become, they need us & we need them,
  • rob Steffens

    QLD
    My wife has Huntingtons, not a good life for my wife. I love Annette bad, What can I say, Hate what this does to my wife. Annette is now in a care place, but I still help with every day things like feeding, nail filing, painting pretty colours on nails, shaving legs, These things are taken for granted by most people, Sit in a wheel chair for hours have to be pushed around and not be able to talk to people what your needs are. This is why I try to help my wife. Staff say to me that they are unable to understand Annette's needs. That is why staff leave Annette alone by staff.
  • Stacie

    NSW
    I care for my mother 3 yrs ago she had a major stroke which left her unable to care for herself or live alone. My husband and I without hesitation said she could live with us. At times it is difficult but I remember and remind myself that this woman gave birth to me and cared for me when I couldn’t care for myself. My husband and I reshuffled or work schedules so that someone is home with her at all times
  • Zoe Sandell

    SA
    I care for my two sons both on the Autism spectrum and now both young men. At 23 and 20 my caring role is to prepare them for living outside the home and to enable them to be as independent from me as possible. I will love and care for them forever but they need me to also love them enough to give them independence and opportunities like any other young men their age. It may take quite a few more years till any of us are ready, but we are getting prepared. I am proud of what they both have achieved and look forward to what can be achieved moving forward
  • Paul Jeremy Nunes

    VIC
    Having been in a situation where I was isolated when I needed care, and seeing how it affected my partner, I decided (once I got my strength back) that my life mission was a "war against loneliness" and to "care for the carers".
  • Melody McEvoy

    NSW
    My reasons for caring comes from my HUMANITY. The world would be nothing without peace, harmony and good people.
  • Herbert Winkler

    SA
    Back in April 2017 my Wife suffered a major stroke which affected her total left part of her body., She is unable to use her left arm and hand and she finds it most difficult to walk with a quad stick. Being married for 57 years it was my duty to become her carer. Because of my love to her I remember our wedding vows "be together until death do us part\". It is a 24 hours job, and I love doing it.
  • Sue and Steve ross

    NSW
    Our son then19 had a brain injury while surfing we bought him home and have cared for him at home for the last 19 years. He is our youngest of 4 and our lives were turned upside down , he is our joy among the sorrow of his tragedy . 19 years later he is still our special boy while he has no speech no movement his smile keeps us going and the love of his brother and sisters and our community
  • Melissa Ninness

    NSW
    I had the best upbringing with my parents & I love them dearly... it was 2014 I had started caring for them, Dec 2015 being they're fulltime carer, my Mum had A.F., vertigo, macular degeneration, sugar diabeties & in the end heart & kidney failure & ended up on dialysis... 3 months after that my Dad was diagnosed with Alzheimer's disease. I've cared unconditionally every day for them for the last 6 years & sadly my Mum passed last Dec, my Dad is in care now & I still go nearly everyday to see him. I can't imagine not not being there for them as they were for me, "unconditionally".
  • Michelle Masefield

    SA
    There isn't enough room to tell my detailed story but I began my life as a carer for our intellectually disabled daughter in 1992 who was aged 2 at that time. I cared for her until she passed away suddenly from Ovarian Cancer in January 2011. For the next 2 years I had a "normal life", however in January 2013 I had to once again put on my carer hat, this time for my husband who was diagnosed with cancer and subsequently he had an ABI in January 2017 from too much chemo so my caring continues. I also cared for my mum for a year until her death from cancer in Nov 2017. I do this because of love.
  • Tania Giorgio

    ACT
    My gorgeous sister in law has had schizophrenia since she was 18. In and out of institutions most of her life until 2012 where after a fall she became disabled. The past 7 years she has been in in a nursing home. For the first 3 and a half in high care and then due to her calling out too often the last 3 and a half in a dementia ward. I have spent many years advocating for her to try and get her into better accommodation. It has been mentally and emotionally draining for us to watch her deteriorate. But my reward is seeing her face light up when she sees me.
  • Fiona Lamb

    QLD
    After dad had a stroke his doctor told us in front of dad “take him home he’s not responding to rehab & it’s a waste of time to continue, he’s dying” We checked dad out & decided to care for him at home. Re modelling their home as the bedrooms were upstairs. Dad was unable to stand and toileting & showering was difficult & involved using an electric lift. The dining room was made into a hospital suite. Although we some care help from a provider it was minimal. Without my sisters dedication of 8 months, we couldn’t have provided the dignity he deserved. Unpaid Carers are asset to Community.
  • Carmencita Rodriguez

    VIC
    I care for my two grand babies and I did for another 6 years ago. My role as a carer both formal and informal came from their mother's and my son been unable for a merid of reasons. It has changed my life and my personal goals for my feature. I love my grandbabies but the demands are huge and supports are truly non existence. I'd never give them up but I've given up on having the life I dreamt of.
  • Lauren

    NSW
    My Nanna was a fit 70 something year old, member of a bushwalking group and avid gardener and chef. Until she had 'the fall.' Since then, my mother and I drop in on our way to and from work to make her breakfast, lunch and dinner and sit with her a while. I have seen the mental impact on my gorgeous nanna, and how hard it is for her to no longer be able to do as many things for herself, but more than that, I have seen the strain on my mother, working full time, managing her household and caring for my nanna. I have felt this strain myself as well. Support the support around you.
  • Shelley CLARKE

    VIC
    Mum has always been there for me. Rough marriage, looking after my boys, my life has never been easy and she is always there. My house burnt down a year after I separated from my husband and she took me in. She had no room but put me up in her second lounge. It became my bedroom and about a month later she also took in my 2 boys when their living situations crumbled. Now she is even letting my son's new fiancee move in to an old caravan I got for his bedroom and she put in a room In the garage for my other son. She was diagnosed 18 mths ago and is declining rapidly. I'd do anything for her.
  • Tania Van Diesen

    VIC
    The reason I care is that I love my Husband more than he will ever know. We have been married for 20 years and were told we would be lucky to get 10. Marriage is about being in a partnership and challenging everything head on as a team. We have proven that as a team were are so strong. Caring is giving of all of yourself. Caring is about the disagreements and the solutions and for all that marriage entails. Educating others on inclusion, and rare conditions that no one, helps or fund raises for. Love is love.
  • Vikki Rose

    VIC
    I have been a recognised full time carer for my 3 children for over 15 years I have 2 children with anaphylaxis to eggs and peanuts as well as severe exczma and asthma I also have another child with Austin’s and severe depression and anxiety that requires 24/7 watch as she has a history to self harm For the whole time I have been a carer I have been unable to engage in any paid work therefore putting an even bigger stress loading into our lives, the government has a number of allowances however the carer payment is means tested and it should only go by what the carer earns
  • Lilian

    WA
    I care for my 91 year old mother because after a long life of facing many adversity, she does not deserve to suffer loneliness as well. She suffered occupation during WW2 during formative years, she has lost all her siblings, she lost her daughter to pancreatic cancer and lost her husband. She contracted an immunological disease after a blood transfusion for her thyroid, she survived umpteen operations , shocking bout of shingles and has suffered an open broken femur while alone calling for hours for help. She has mild dementia. A long brave life. Why would I not care for.
  • Valerie Wagstaff

    SA
    I have been caring for Hearing Impaired son for many years. As he got older, late teens, he also became Mentally ill. I will always care for him because he is my son and I love him unconditionally. His illness is very complex and being Hearing Impaired makes it doubly complex. Sadly he was born with the Severe Hearing loss. He is now an older man, not coping to well, he will always need help and I will be there for as long as I can.
  • Carina McGarry

    QLD
    I care because my Mum no longer has anyone to care for. My Mum spent 41 years caring for her son, my brother. On 31st August 2019 cancer took him from us. I care because she now sits at home alone with no one to talk to, to care for. Carer's are the most underrated, unpaid and unsupported part of our communities. Their families and the people they care for think they are awesome and the carers just say that they do it because they love their family and that's what you do for family. But where is the support for the parents who no longer have someone to care for? What does my Mum do now?
  • Graeme Rouillon

    QLD
    We have a daughter with a Disability. She was born in 1983 with a very rare condition and it was a miracle she lived. It looks five years to diagnose. She had to learn everything, speech, eating, walking. Then when she was 12 and a half, she developed Rheumatoid Arthritis. This has had a major impact on her life and my wife and I in caring for her. She has had a Shoulder replacement at 19 and then in the years to follow, she had two elbows replaced. This year she has had her left wrist fused. This is just a short story here but as Parents and Carers it is a very long and painful story.
  • Kim Hodge

    QLD
    I am my husband's Carer. He served his country for 20 years. He now lives with PTSD, depression and anxiety. When he is well he is a loving, caring, devoted husband, and when he is unwell he struggles to get through the day. I wound up my business to give more attention to his needs, and my own. It terrifies me to lose my financial security and independence. But it needed to happen. He is my biggest supporter, and I am his. 'Care' is a community concern. And we have started our own community.
  • Therese Murphy

    VIC
    My reason for caring is simple: I love my husband who has dementia. Another reason is that none of his family contribute to his care. Without me to care for him, I am sure my husband's illness would be further on.
  • Tania Giorgio

    ACT
    I care because I adore my sister in law who is on a good day funny, caring and loving. I care because I can not stand injustice to younger people with both mental and physical disability in any setting being subjected to mistreatment, neglected, abused or violence. I believe strongly that any young person with disabilities should never enter a nursing home and definitely not be put in a locked dementia ward like my sister in law who is catatonic schizophrenic and disabled and being denied freedom of choice of where to live. I will continue to this fight till the end.
  • Janette Costa Cancino

    VIC
    I am a 42 years old mum of 3 boys with autism. I do care because they are my live and I hope for them a future full of opportunities.
  • Vickie James

    TAS
    Lm caring because love compels me to care, to comitt my life to her til we part, lm her mother, her advocate,teacher & nurse, shes a joy, givin each other comfort, stability & friendship..At times its not easy, lm tired, lve missed out on many opport unities, jobs, social events, family & friends however this girl is worth it. Living is only purposeful if it has care towards others.. Thanks. Vickie & Bethany.
  • Mia

    NSW
    I'm a carer and by nature a caring person,have always been. I'm not too sure about celebrating carers as the Government keeps us in poverty. It's an extremely hard thing do,full time care and watch your family slowly fall under the poverty line and help is nowhere to be found. Whilst I'd never want but to care for my son,it is heartbreaking to see just how little we are apprwciated especially by government entities. I would love nothing more than for our decision makers to come down to the grassroots level to see just how much we carers do. Some of us do the work of 12 people.
  • Amy

    VIC
    I care for my Mum, who has cerebral palsy, and other health concerns. She is in her late 60's, and I have been her carer since for almost 28 years. I'm in my early 30's which makes it a very long time being a carer, considering I was essentially born into the role. It can be incredible difficult to speak to non-carers about my role, they make offhand remarks like "I do similar for my family so I should also get that payment too", when they have no idea how insulting that is towards both myself and my Mum, or other carers. I care because I love her. I will always care for her.
  • Trudy

    TAS
    6 years ago my hubby had a work related accident so it was a 4 year journey of many medical specialists Lawyers etc I was automatically put on Carers pension because of his mental ups and downs I stood by him 100 percent the whole time During that time I was diagnosed with an autoimmune medical condition but had no time to focus on that Also my mother passed away and for the last 5 years I also have put in 100 percent ensuring my Father is healthy and happy I give a big big thankyou to Carers Tas for their help and support... even support for me the Carer
  • Noreen McCabe

    QLD
    I am a recognised carer for my child with disabilities, but also an "informal" carer for my 88 year old grandmother, who has been more like a mother to me than a grandmother. My grandfather passed away almost 4 years ago and my grandmother lives alone with her dog. I take care of all administration for her, do her shopping, pay her bills, organise and transport her to appointments, cook and help look after her home. It's a lot as a single parent, but the underlying reason why I care is because I love her. I want her remaining time to be filled with happiness and love. Plain and simple.
  • Karen

    NSW
    I care because he is my son, and I love him with my whole heart, the bond we share is forever. I care because my son needs me 24 hours a day, without help he would not survive. His name is Bradley, he's almost 26 years old. He has level 4 Cerebal Palsy, he has Epilepsy and is also serverly intelectually delayed. If you meet Brad, you would never forget him. His smile and determination is my inspiration
  • Naomi

    VIC
    I care for my daughter who has an intellectual disability, autism, epilepsy, incontinence, scoliosis, and is non-verbal. She also has "behaviours of concern". I love that term! I care because I love her more than life itself. She is my whole world, and I am hers. She has a wicked sense of humour and is very funny. On the flip side, she also has the most hideous temper that some days makes me want to run away from home. I work full time to get some peace in my day so that I can keep caring and not burn out. I would love some more me-time, but I wouldn't change it for the world.
  • Wendy Butler

    QLD
    After many years of DV on my baby brother by our mother, he now lives my my husband and I. He is 45 and cannot read or write. We are constantly taking my brother to all his medical and other specialist appointments. It got to much for me to be a full time carer and full time study, so i decided to withdraw from my studies to look after my brother. I am now getting paid from Centrelink as a carer but the little bit extra i get is being used up in the way of travel and fuel to take him to his appointments. I will never give up on him as he in my sibling and we love him unconditionally.
  • Melanie Jane

    NSW
    I care for my Son diagnosed with schizophrenia, he has been in hospital for over a year and my heart is constantly breaking, I believe he will get better and have all the good things that this life has to offer, he is such an amazing and heart felt, gifted, good and talented person. I was blessed to be his Mother and the most important person in his life to date. I pray one day he will find a beautiful girl who understands, this handsome man and has the courage to stand by him as they support each other, through any days of trial. We do this and we do it together, as a loving family of 7+et.al

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